Acupuncture: An Old Debate Continues

By Weiss, Rick | Science News, August 20, 1988 | Go to article overview

Acupuncture: An Old Debate Continues


Weiss, Rick, Science News


Acupuncture: An old debate continues

Controversy about acupuncture's usefulness as a painkiller continues to rage. In the past 10 years, a small but steady stream of research has suggested that certain acupuncture treatments are indeed analgesic. But the ongoing mystery of acupuncture's mechanism of action -- and the less-than-ideal experimental designs characteristic of so many acupuncture trials--have left many Western scientists and journal reviewers skeptical. From the range of findings reported last week:

* Joseph M. Helms, a physician with the American Academy of Acupuncture in Berkeley, Calif., performed acupuncture treatments on 43 women diagnosed with primary dysmenorrhea (menstrual pain). Some of the women received real acupuncture treatments, some received placebo acupuncture (shallow needle treatments, not at actual acupuncture points), some had monthly, nonacupuncture visits with the doctor and some were followed with no intervention.

The women recorded "monthly pain scores" based on intensity and duration of menstrual pain during a three-month treatment period and for nine months following the cessation of treatment. Later, researchers compared these levels to pretreatment scores, calculated by the women at the beginning of the study. These scores described pain levels for either the month previous to treatment or from an average of the preceding six months, whichever value was highest.

In the real acupuncture group, 10 of 11 women showed significant improvement (defined as pain scores averaging less than half the pretreatment scores). Four of 11 in the placebo acupuncture group showed improvement. Of the other two nonacupuncture groups, 2 of 11 and of 10 showed improvement.

In addition, Helms says, the real acupuncture group required 54 percent fewer pain medications during treatment and 41 percent fewer during the nine-month follow-up. No other group showed similar reductions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Acupuncture: An Old Debate Continues
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.