All about Yve Adam

By White, Dave | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), October 24, 2000 | Go to article overview

All about Yve Adam


White, Dave, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


An up-and-coming lesbian singer tells how she and her hetero band mate make music for everybody's ears

"The record label has never asked me to be in the closet. Ever. But at the same time, they don't want to terrify all the poor straight boys who think I'm cute." So goes the very modern dilemma of Yve, a San Francisco-born, Canada-residing singer-songwriter who's out of the closet--and out on a tour of college towns across America--with her band mate, Adam Popowitz, who plays the hetero Captain to her lesbian Tennille.

Together they are Yve Adam, and their music is a gentle brew of feminine alt-pop that shared a stage with Sarah McLachlan on the 1998 Lilith Fair tour. "Imperfect Girl," the first single from their debut CD, Fiction, is a sweetly catchy, 3 1/2-minute ode to self-possession, crafted of smart folk lyrics, electro-acoustic strumming, and Beach Boys harmony. After serenading the college crowd, they might go off to Australia for more touring. After touring, Yve will make it back to Vancouver, her adopted home, where "maybe I have a girlfriend," she coyly jokes.

Yve Adam, the band, evolved out of Yve and Adam's mutual membership in Mollies Revenge, a short-lived but respected Canadian band that, in Yve's words, "got signed but never broke. …

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