Wines of Portugal

Korea Times (Seoul, Korea), October 25, 2000 | Go to article overview

Wines of Portugal


When you think of the wines of Portugal, chances are that you will think of the world best known vintage dessert wine called Port. So many writers around the world, including myself have written about this celebrated wine that many wine lovers go think of Port as the other name of this tiny nation tugged against Atlantic ocean.

Tiny as it seems, Portugal is ranked high in many aspects of current world affairs. To name just one, the Portuguese language is spoken by as many people as, if not more, the language of Spanish around the world. You may think I must be kidding. Well, just look at Brazil, the biggest single state in South America, where Portuguese is the official language. The wines of Portugal are no exception to this notion and I would like to explore the Portuguese wines beyond Port in this column today.

Scenic, postcard-perfect Portugal is the place for wine romance, with sunlight shining through the arbor of vines, creaky ox carts rolling along along the picturesque countryside, the ritual treading of the red and purple grapes and the singing of songs that have been handed down from generations to generation. The climate, especially in Northern Portugal, is ideal for wine grapes as the region enjoys ample rain as well as the long bright and blazing summer heat. The region also has the Atlantic characteristics of Bordeaux wines as this area is south of the French Bordeaux region.

The most interesting elements in Portuguese wines are the types of grapes they grow and the ways the these grapes are used to make the finished products. Long before Portugal's entry into the European Community (EC) in 1986, certain wine appellations were demarcated and every aspect of their wine making law was not always up to par with the quality standards of that of French Bordeaux or to the liking of merchants and their customers. They insisted to keep on making wines their own way.

Among the original wines, the most famous one remains Vinho Verde, better known as the green wine of the northern- most province. The characteristics of this grape variety include its unripe freshness and light red color like a Rose. These vines are grown on tree branches and pergolas around little plots of land. It is like a wild grape of sorts and can be seen along every country road. Because the grapes are high off from the ground, they stays cool so that the level of freshness in acidity remains high until harvest time.

Over time, as the country's tourism industry pushed up the demand for Bordeaux-type red wines, some skillful wine merchants began making wines of their own by blending, the method widely used in Bordeaux. This blending technique gave the final product the robust, invigorating tannic and earthy flavor. They also created notably aromatic as well as complex wines that have excellent value. Ten years of aging may have been excessive for most Portuguese table wines in the old days, however the Reservas connoted by Garrafeira of today are an exception. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Wines of Portugal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.