More Feared Killed in Abu Sayyaf Clash

Manila Bulletin, September 11, 2000 | Go to article overview

More Feared Killed in Abu Sayyaf Clash


JOLO (AFP) -- More than a dozen Abu Sayyaf Muslim kidnapers were killed in factional gun battles over ransom money Saturday, sources close to hostage negotiations said yesterday.

Abu Sayyaf leaders Galib Andang and Mujib Susukan were to bury the dead at noon yesterday and hold a meeting later, with the possibility of revenge attacks high on the agenda, the sources said.

Andang, also known as Commander Robot, and Susukan were among 20 people wounded in the gunbattle after being attacked by another faction as they were about to free four Europeans after 140 days in captivity.

The German, two Finns and a Frenchman were the last remaining European hostages among 21 tourists and resort workers snatched by Andang's group from a Malaysian resort in April.

The rest were freed in batches earlier and the only remaining Sipadan hostage is a Filipino dive instructor.

The Abu Sayyaf officially freed the hostages in exchange for pledges of "development aid" from Libya, but reports said Tripoli also paid millions of dollars in ransom.

Philippine intelligence sources said the rebels had used their cash to purchase more guns, vehicles and hire more people, but that some Abu Sayyaf rebels were not satisfied with their share of the loot.

"Robot and Mujib are busy tending to their dead who are to be buried at noon. Both are expected to carry out a revenge shortly after that," a source said.

Andang's group still holds 15 other Filipinos while two other factions are holding two French television journalists and an American hostage.

If a revenge attack takes place later Sunday, it could derail government efforts to free the two French television journalists, the sources said.

Negotiations

ZAMBOANGA (Reuters) - Philippine negotiators will resume talks mid-week with Muslim rebels for freeing two French television journalists and a Filipino they still hold hostage, officials said yesterday.

The Abu Sayyaf rebels have been spooked by an internal clash in which at least three people were killed as they released four European hostages on the southern island of Jolo on Saturday, chief negotiator Robert Aventajado told reporters.

He had said previously the three remaining hostages could be freed soon but said rebel chieftain Galib Andang, also known as Commander Robot, was worried about the attack.

A separate rebel faction is holding an American kidnapped last month, but negotiations for his release have not made much progress.

"Robot needs to recover his confidence about the security of himself and his people, including the safety of the French journalists," Aventajado said.

"It might be taking too much risk if we do the operation immediately. So we agreed to talk again on Tuesday."

Officials had said they had wanted all six European captives to leave together for Tripoli, Libya, where they are to be handed over to their governments.

But because the release of the others had been delayed, the four already freed could leave later on Sunday for the handover, which recognizes Libya's intervention in the crisis.

Finns Risto Mirco Vahanen and Seppo Juhani Franti, German Marc Wallert and Frenchman Stephane Loisy were freed after government emissaries going to fetch them were ambushed by a rival rebel faction which wanted to loot the ransom, said to be $1 million per hostage. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

More Feared Killed in Abu Sayyaf Clash
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.