GPRA and HRSA: From Results Act to Action

By Pane, Karen W. | The Public Manager, Spring 2000 | Go to article overview

GPRA and HRSA: From Results Act to Action


Pane, Karen W., The Public Manager


The Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) shows many positive effects of the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA). Two that come to the top of the list are:

* an increased focus on program outcomes and impact; and

* an increased attention to crosscutting and coordination activities among federal agencies and nonfederal partners.

First of all, within my own agency, HRSA, GPRA has substantially changed the way we coordinate our diverse programs around our central goal of 100 percent access and zero health disparities for all Americans. Similarly, it has helped us to facilitate the linkage of our goal, four strategies and performance measures with the Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) strategic plan.

Lead Federal Agency

HRSA is the lead federal agency in promoting access to health care services that create and improve the nation's health. HRSA is an agency with multiple programs but with a single strategic goal: assure 100 percent access to health care and zero health disparities for all Americans. To meet our goal, we have established alliances and partnerships with other federal agencies and with a broad array of organizations ranging from state and local governments, and to foundations and corporations. Listed below are a couple of examples from two of HRSA's bureaus on how they used the outcome-oriented performance management approach and coordination to achieve their performance outcomes.

Within the Bureau of Primary Health Care, the health centers and the National Health Service Corps form a cost effective, integrated safety net for the under-served and uninsured in approximately 4,000 communities across the country. Tracking individual health center and site performance measures has enabled the program to improve its overall level of performance continuously.

The Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) works with its grantees at the state and local level in setting terms, standards and benchmarks with regards to performance measurement. …

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