Reports from American Planning Association

Public Management, October 2000 | Go to article overview

Reports from American Planning Association


The American Planning Association's (APA) report--Aesthetics, Community Character, and the Law--co produced with Scenic America, looks at the tools that dozens of growing and changing communities are using to protect their local individuality and attractiveness. The report also provides assistance to those localities in the beginning stages of the process, who seek to define the elusive term "character."

Throughout the greater history of the profession, planners have typically considered the quality-of-life impacts of new development by examining such items as fiscal analyses or environmental impact reports. Increasingly, however, today's key considerations include not only these measures but also such appearance issues as color, height, greenery, sky or ridgeline obstruction, and the fit of new designs with existing facades.

Copies of Aesthetics, Community Character, and the Law can be ordered from the APA's Planners' Book Service on-line at www.planning.org or by calling 312/786-6344.

In response to America's growing interest in developing more livable towns and cities, APA has published a report featuring dozens of communities that provide the country with models of compact, pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods and urban places.

Crossroads, Hamlet, Village, Town: Design Characteristics of Traditional Neighborhoods, Old and New, by Randall Arendt, examines the physical layout of communities and the relationship of homes to streets, parks, footpaths, and bikeways. Approximately 80 communities in 29 states from Maine to California are singled out as models of livable neighborhoods containing open spaces that, the author says, "are more than just unbuildable land, plus an obligatory green or ballfield. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Reports from American Planning Association
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.