Tourism; Korean Tourism: From Zero to Booming Industry in Decades

Korea Times (Seoul, Korea), November 1, 2000 | Go to article overview

Tourism; Korean Tourism: From Zero to Booming Industry in Decades


Just as `diet' or `recreation' are relatively recent concepts, the word ``tourism'' meant nothing to Koreans who lived in the early part of the last century. Amid the extreme poverty and hardship caused by the decades of Japanese colonial rule and the subsequent Korean War, most Koreans' primary objective in life was simply to survive. Naturally, any kind of entertainment or recreation, including traveling for the sake of pleasure, was considered a luxury.

The situation did not improve much until the end of the 1950s when there was virtually nothing to call tourist business or institution in the country. It was only in 1962 that the government began to realize the importance of tourism industry and establish the state-run institution International Tourism Cooperation, currently the Korea National Tourism Organization.

Over the years, the tourism industry has taken on more importance, partly due to the changing global atmosphere. In particular, technological advance and introduction of Internet communication these days are bringing closer people around the globe, both in physical and psychological dimension. It is no surprise that the government has designated tourism, once considered marginal in the national industry, as the major industry of the new era.

Against this background, it will be worthwhile to trace the 38 years of evolution of the Korean National Tourism Organization, since the organization represents the modern history of tourism in Korea.

The 1960s- Birth of Tourism Industry

The International Tourism Cooperation-- which changed its name as Korea National Tourism Corporation in 1986 and again in 1992 as National Tourism Corporation Organization-- was founded on May 26th in 1962. At the time, Korea had basically absent in tourist accommodation and recreation facilities, except only a handful of poorly operated state-run hotels. The need to revamp these facilit es and establish basic tourism institution in the country was growing.

The founding goal of the ITC was to create basic tourism infrastructure in ord r to attract more foreign currency. At the start of the organization, ITC began buyi g the sluggish state-run hotels and tourist shops to make radical reformation on the facilities. Among them are hotels in Haeundae Beach in Pusan, Pulkuksa Temple in Kyongju, Mt. Sorak in Kangwon province and Sokwipo city in Cheju Island. Upon taking up these facilities, ITC invested additional 2.5 billion won to revamp them and rationalize the managing system.

In 1965, ICT opened Bando Arcade, Korea's earliest shopping mall in downtown Seoul, while privatizing three state-run hotels in Sokwipo, Kwangju, and Mt. Sorak in an effort to give boost to the burgeoning tourism sector. In 1969, the ICT branch was first set up in Tokyo, marking the first case of Korean tourism office established in overseas country.

In general, the period marks the start of national tourism, where the government taking the lead in establishing the basic framework for the industry. As a result of this effort, the number of foreign tourists first reached the 100,000 level in 1968.

The 1970s- Development of Infrastructure

This is the period when ITC began to put more emphasis on tourism promotion targeting foreign tourists. It invested the profit earned from various tourism usiness such as liquor sale, rental of stores in shopping arcade, and hotel investment, into a series of tourism promotion projects.

Among the projects were to raise Korea's visibility at various international tourism-related institutions, and to step up promotion activities at international airports, seaports and other transportation hubs. A number of tourist offices were set up in cities like Hong Kong, San Francisco, Paris, and Singapore.

At domestic level, ITC worked toward widening tourism information service and improve accommodation and recreational facilities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tourism; Korean Tourism: From Zero to Booming Industry in Decades
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.