The New Victims of Hate: Bias Crimes Hit America's Fastest-Growing Ethnic Group

By Clemetson, Lynette | Newsweek, November 6, 2000 | Go to article overview

The New Victims of Hate: Bias Crimes Hit America's Fastest-Growing Ethnic Group


Clemetson, Lynette, Newsweek


John Lee can barely remember the most terrifying night of his life. One moment he was meeting friends on the steps of his dorm at the State University of New York at Binghamton, the next he lay hospitalized with a fractured skull. In February, Lee and three other Asian-American students were jumped by three members of the school's wrestling team, who attacked with head butts, kicks and racial slurs. As Lee heard witnesses describe the taunts his attackers shouted--"You damned chink! That's what you get!"--he came to a sickening realization. "It was all because of race," says the 19-year-old Korean-American. "I never thought I could be the victim of a hate crime."

In the past 10 years the nation's Asian population has soared more than 43 percent to roughly 11 million, making them the fastest-growing minority group. But as the numbers have exploded, so have attacks like the one against Lee. A new report by a coalition of Asian-American civil-rights groups shows that violent attacks against Asian-Americans have risen in the '90s--to 486 incidents last year from 335 in 1993.

A spate of troubling cases in recent months has underscored concerns. In September two teens wielding a broken broomstick beat a 50-year-old Laotian man in Baltimore as he stood waiting for a bus. And at Cornell University there have been three reports of racially motivated assaults against Asian women in the last month and a half. "We see the backlash as communities and social dynamics change," says Sin Yen Ling, an attorney with the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund. "There is fear on all sides, and it's becoming more deadly."

Part of the problem is that hate crimes against Asian-Americans are vastly underreported. A cultural reluctance to cause a fuss often prevents victims from coming forward, and those who do may feel more comfortable reporting incidents to community groups than to police. Of the three other Asian-American students attacked on the same night as Lee, two have decided to remain anonymous. And Lee himself has been reluctant to become a poster child for activists. "I just want to put it behind me and get on with my life," he says. Police officers, too, often fail to recognize incidents as being racially motivated. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The New Victims of Hate: Bias Crimes Hit America's Fastest-Growing Ethnic Group
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.