New York Regional Titles Go National; but While Spy Flies High, Manhattan, Inc. Struggles to Find Itself

By Garry, Michael | Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management, October 1988 | Go to article overview

New York Regional Titles Go National; but While Spy Flies High, Manhattan, Inc. Struggles to Find Itself


Garry, Michael, Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management


New York regional titles go national

New York City--Spy and Manhattan, inc., which focus almost obsessively on the rich, famous and powerful of New York City, are discovering a considerable audience outside of the Big Apple.

But that's where the similarity ends. Two-year-old Spy, the current darling of the New York yuppie set, is raking in ad pages, readers and publicity. Manhattan, inc. has suffered a 20 percent drop in ad pages through the first half of the year, and is struggling, sources say, to redefine its editorial identity.

"There are a lot of ex-New Yorkers outside of New York, as well as people who are intrigued about New York," says Lisa Auslander, circulation manager of Spy, whose forte is the sardonic skewering of New York celebrities. Adds publisher Tom Phillips, "We always expected national distribution." The September issue's theme, in fact, was Los Angeles.

The magazine hired Select, the national distributor, to boost its September single-copy draw by 30,000, to 92,000, and then, on a conditional basis, to increase the draw by 10,000 copies each month. Select will take the magazine to such new cities as Cleveland and New Orleans, and new outlets, such as transportation terminals, convenience stores and supermarkets.

During the first half of 1988, sell-through surpassed 70 percent, notes Auslander. And the circulation gains come at a fruitful time for Spy--the ad page count in September was almost double that of the previous year.

Prior to hiring Select, just under half of Spy's circulation was in New York City. Its September circulation reached 113,000, though the rate base remained 65,000. (The rate base will rise to 130,000 in January.) The newsstand/subscription split is about 50:50.

On the direct mail front, Spy found that gross response has been higher (5.5 percent to 6.0 percent) among non-New Yorkers. Of 306,000 pieces sent in June, about 30 percent were sent outside New York.

Spy's national aspirations have not been hurt by press attention in such newspapers as USA Today. And beginning in June, articles from the magazine became available to 45 to 50 newspapers through national syndication. Spy is also publishing a book series jointly with Doubleday, and a syndicated radio show and a television show are under discussion.

Circulation up, but not pages

Four-year-old Manhattan, inc., which early in its publishing history won a National Magazine Award for its coverage of New York City's rich and powerful, has attempted to expand nationally, not only in circulation, but in editorial content as well. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

New York Regional Titles Go National; but While Spy Flies High, Manhattan, Inc. Struggles to Find Itself
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.