Where a Million Birds Stop over ... Klamath Basin

Sunset, October 1988 | Go to article overview

Where a Million Birds Stop over ... Klamath Basin


Darkening the skies with their numbers, so many migrating waterfowl flock to the Klamath Basin on the California-Oregon border that world-famous bird-watcher Roger Tory Peterson has named the area one of America's 10 best birding spots. Just north of Lava Beds National Monument, it's about a 5-hour drive ftom Sacramento, but well worth it.

Late August through November, a million birds stop over to feed and rest in the six wildlife refuges in the Klamath Basin, one of their most important stops along the Pacific Flyway. The massive clouds of birds at a single refuge in just a daywave upon wave of cackling, squawking, gossiping waterfowl-will strike you with wonder and awe. You needn't be an experienced bird-watcher to enjoy the sight.

The best places to watch are at Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge and Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge. They lie between state highways 139 and 161; together they contain 85,600 acres of wetlands-an increasingly important habitat since only 25 percent of California's once vast wetlands remain.

You can take a brochure-guided auto tour to see impressive concentrations of tundra swans, white-fronted geese, snow geese, and Canada geese. One special sight warrants staying at either refuge until dusk: just before sunset, the great flocks rise off the water, gather in the air, circle, and come to rest for the night in nearby fields. You'll also see a wide variety of ducks. Some colorful ones to look out for are the dramatically marked hooded merganser, the wide-billed shoveler, and tbe small bluish-billed bufflehead. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Where a Million Birds Stop over ... Klamath Basin
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.