Future Unclear for Miller Freeman Staff

By Steil, Jennifer F. | Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management, October 2000 | Go to article overview

Future Unclear for Miller Freeman Staff


Steil, Jennifer F., Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management


VNU's Bill Communications will absorb holdings; San Francisco office to shut down in December.

The Miller Freeman USA assets that were acquired by Dutch publisher VNU in July for $650 million will merge into VNU subsidiary Bill Communications, probably by the end of this year, according to a company spokesperson. By the same token, Miller Freeman USA will also lose its name and close its San Francisco headquarters-possibly eliminating dozens of jobs.

About 140 employees work at Miller Freeman's San Francisco headquarters. Bill Communications president Michael Marchesano says there will be job opportunities in New York for employees now in the San Francisco office. Meanwhile, Miller Freeman president Don Pazour is now deciding what his next move will be, while senior vice president Darrel Denny has left the company. However, according to Marchesano, most of the Miller Freeman management team is staying put.

Aside from its magazine, trade show and conference divisions being absorbed by Bill or VNU, not much else will change in terms of content.

"Miller Freeman is going away as its own entity. Bill is either absorbing some [Miller Freeman] positions or moving them to New York," says a spokesperson. "There maybe some transfer opportunities. But I only know a couple of people so far who have been approached about the possibility of moving."

Miller Freeman USA also has offices in New York, Dallas, Laguna Beach, California and Santa Monica, California, as well as a few satellite offices throughout the country, all of which will probably remain open, the spokesperson says. …

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