Landscape Lessons from the 1987 Fire in Pebble Beach

Sunset, November 1988 | Go to article overview

Landscape Lessons from the 1987 Fire in Pebble Beach


Fires teach harsh lessons. And those lessons have been starkly apparent over the last two summers, when fires have swept through several Western communities. If we have another dry winter this year, yet fail to reduce fire risks around homes in high-danger areas, next summer could be even worse. On the last day of May, 1987, a fire swept up a hillside in Pebble Beach, California, eventually burning 140 acres and destroying 31 homes. Fueling the flames were a thick accumulation of dry needies under the native pines, overgrown brush close to homes, and flammable roofs on many of the houses. The house pictured above, owned by Barbara Burdick, was spared by the fire, though some of its landscaping was destroyed. However, a 40-foot-wide swath of that garden, planted with slow-to-ignite ground cover, actually helped keep flames at bay. And falling embers from surrounding trees failed to ignite the house's asphalt-and-gravel built-up roof.

A year later, new plants take root, old ones resprout After the fire, the garden was cleared and replanted with drought-tolerant species. Burned trees and shrubs were cut back but their root systems were left in place to help prevent erosion. Some plants have since resprouted.

In fact, nature's response to most fires is rapid regrowth, which can cause problems when you're trying to relandscape. On the Burdick property, the fire caused many seeds, including Monterey pine and weedy broom, to germinate. Such plants can be killed with contact weed killers or prevented with pre-emergent herbicides. However, native plants that grow or resprout in burned areas are often the best adapted for that region; if possible, save or transplant them. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Landscape Lessons from the 1987 Fire in Pebble Beach
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.