Grizzlies' Rebirth in Rockies Lies in Hands of Locals

By Richardson, Valerie | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 27, 2000 | Go to article overview

Grizzlies' Rebirth in Rockies Lies in Hands of Locals


Richardson, Valerie, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


DENVER - The Fish and Wildlife Service's plans to reintroduce the grizzly bear could be a turning point in the federal government's approach to wildlife releases.

For the first time, the agency has agreed to rely on local control for the release and management of an endangered species. In a statement last week, the agency announced that the reintroduction of grizzly bears to the Bitterroot Mountains in Idaho and Montana would be run by a 15-member citizen-management committee instead of federal managers.

In doing so, the agency is gambling that allowing local timber workers, ranchers and environmentalists to manage the program will help curb the protests, lawsuits and hard feelings that surrounded the mid-1990s Canadian wolf reintroduction at Yellowstone National Park.

"Giving local people ownership of the issue should provide more security and well-being for grizzly bears," Chris Servheen, the agency's grizzly-bear recovery coordinator, told the Associated Press. "It has the potential to ensure a much more secure future."

Not surprisingly, the program's citizen-management aspect drew virtually uniform praise from Westerners who have fought for decades to gain a greater voice in managing their lands. But it failed to squelch dissent from those who don't want to see grizzly bears roaming through the Bitterroot's timber country, no matter who manages them.

The strongest opposition came from Gov. Dirk Kempthorne, Idaho Republican, who threatened last week to pursue "all legal options available" to stop the reintroduction.

"I oppose bringing these massive, flesh-eating carnivores into Idaho," he said. "This is perhaps the first federal land management action in history likely to result in injury or death of members of the public."

Even Mr. Kempthorne, however, has expressed support for the citizen-management concept, said Hank Fischer, Northern Rockies director of the Defenders of Wildlife.

"He's maintained that position [against reintroduction], said Mr. Fischer. He's also said that if bear restoration has to take place, the proposal we have is the best way to do it.

The Idaho and Montana farm bureaus also are fighting the reintroduction. But Gov. Marc Racicot, Montana Republican, is holding off on issuing an opinion, saying he wants to study the agency's record of decision first.

Under last week's decision, the agency plans to bring five grizzlies per year for five years into the Bitterroot back country starting in 2002. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Grizzlies' Rebirth in Rockies Lies in Hands of Locals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.