An Evaluation of Client Satisfaction with Training Programs and Technical Assistance Provided by Florida's Coordinated School Health Program Office

By Weiler, Robert M.; Pigg, R. Morgan, Jr. | Journal of School Health, November 2000 | Go to article overview

An Evaluation of Client Satisfaction with Training Programs and Technical Assistance Provided by Florida's Coordinated School Health Program Office


Weiler, Robert M., Pigg, R. Morgan, Jr., Journal of School Health


The Coordinated School Health Program (CSHP) has been described as an organized set of policies, procedures, and activities designed to protect and promote the health and well-being of students and school personnel.[1,2] The eight components of a CSHP include health education, physical education, health services, nutrition services, counseling and psychological services, healthful school environment, employee health promotion, and family and community involvement.[1] The Coordinated School Health Program Office (CSHPO) in the Florida Department of Education receives funding through a cooperative agreement with the Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The program aims to strengthen the capacity of the Florida Department of Education to give local education agencies the training and technical assistance essential to developing and improving coordinated school health programs at the district and school levels. Current efforts of the Florida CSHPO focus on strengthening HIV/STD prevention education, strengthening comprehensive school health education, and building district and school level infrastructures required for first-rate school health programs. In addition, the Florida CSHPO assists school districts in implementing the standards and benchmarks of The Sunshine State Standards for Health and Physical Education.[3] As its mission, the Florida CSHPO seeks to improve overall student health and well-being and to improve academic achievement.

Administratively, the CSHPO is based in the Bureau of Instructional Support and Community Services, Division of Public Schools and Community Education, Florida Department of Education. The CSHPO works in collaboration with the Florida Department of Health (DOH). Its staff of six includes an executive director, a program specialist for the HIV/AIDS education project, a program specialist for coordinated school health education, a coordinator for the Coordinated School Health Program Resource Center, a research assistant, and an office assistant. Project partners include a director of coordinated school health programs for the Florida Department of Health and a support position as well. Besides administering, managing, and conducting all components of a cooperative agreement with the CDC, during the past three years the CSHPO: 1) established a Coordinated School Health Program Resource Center; 2) sponsored two symposia on school health and higher education; 3) administered the School Health Education Profile, a CDC-sponsored random survey of school principals and lead teachers to determine the status of health education and HIV prevention programs in schools; and 4) assisted DOH in administrating the 1997 and 1999 Florida Youth Risk Behavior Surveys.

RATIONALE FOR A SATISFACTION SURVEY

Client satisfaction -- referred to in other settings as customer, patient, or participant satisfaction -- represents one of several evaluation components used to examine the quality of health promotion programs. According to Windsor et al,[4](p.121) "... health promotion programs should provide documentation of having conducted surveys of community, consumer, and participant awareness of and satisfaction with the program." Findings from such surveys help evaluators determine program impact and effectiveness.[4]

To cite a common example, evaluators often use satisfaction surveys to examine the content or process of staff development and in-service training programs. Underscoring the importance of participant satisfaction, CDC's Division of Adolescent and School Health included a sample satisfaction assessment instrument in the Handbook for Evaluating HIV Education.[5] Developed to evaluate HIV staff development programs, the Participant Satisfaction Evaluation Checklist includes 16 items to assess the quality of content, instructional activities, time, staff, room arrangements, and instructional materials using an evaluative rating scale with three response options: poor, satisfactory, and excellent. …

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