140 Years and Counting Lombard's Trinity Lutheran School Celebrates History of Religious Education

By Sanchez, Robert | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 26, 2000 | Go to article overview

140 Years and Counting Lombard's Trinity Lutheran School Celebrates History of Religious Education


Sanchez, Robert, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Robert Sanchez Daily Herald Staff Writer

In 1953 dozens of outraged mothers took dramatic action following the death of a Trinity Lutheran School student.

The women formed a human roadblock across Roosevelt Road where it meets Westmore-Meyers Road in Lombard - bringing traffic to a halt where a young girl was struck and killed by a car while walking to school.

They were protesting the lack of traffic signals and stop signs at the intersection near Trinity Lutheran School.

The protest drummed up lots of media attention. A photo of the women standing hand-in-hand across Roosevelt Road appeared on the front page of a Chicago newspaper.

More importantly, it led to the state installing traffic lights at the intersection.

It's one of many contributions to Lombard that Trinity Lutheran School parents, teachers and students are remembering as their school turns 140 years old.

"Everyone has that one great, good place," Trinity parent Lori Solyom said. "For some people, it's the bar where everyone knows their name. For Trinity church and school families, Trinity has become that great, good place."

For as long as anyone can remember, Solyom said, the school and adjoining Trinity Lutheran Church - built in 1868 - have been landmark fixtures on the northeast corner of Roosevelt and Westmore-Meyers roads.

"It's unbelievable that the school has been around that long," said Trinity Parent Sue Bower, who has a son in seventh grade and a daughter in fifth grade.

"I graduated from a Lutheran school too, so that's why I felt it was important to send my children to a Lutheran school as well," Bower said. "Trinity has been around so long and has so much to offer ... it was the clear choice."

One benefit of the school, which enrolls preschoolers through eighth-graders, is its "family" environment.

Principal Kenneth Krohse, who has been with the school since 1983, welcomes the 145 students outside the main doors every morning and sees them off as they go home at the end of the day.

Krohse said the school's size and relationship to the church create its family environment.

"The teachers and students all go to church together on Sunday and study together during the week," he said. "Everyone knows each other. I know all the students by name. I know their parents."

Bower said a positive relationship between Trinity's parents and 10 teachers helps parents be involved in their children's' education.

"You have more of a say," she said. "You are not lost in the school system. You are not just another face within a sea of faces. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

140 Years and Counting Lombard's Trinity Lutheran School Celebrates History of Religious Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.