ROBOTS Help Surgeon Perform More Precise Surgery

By Bren, Linda | FDA Consumer, November 2000 | Go to article overview

ROBOTS Help Surgeon Perform More Precise Surgery


Bren, Linda, FDA Consumer


While gripping hand controls, depressing foot pedals, and watching a 3-D video display, a surgeon removed the gall bladder of a 35-year-old woman at Henrico Doctor's Hospital in Richmond, Va. The surgery occurred this summer, just one day after FDA cleared for marketing a robotic device to perform laparoscopic gall bladder and gastroesophageal reflux disease (severe heartburn) surgery.

In standard laparoscopic surgery, the surgeon, while standing over the patient, makes up to four small incisions in the abdomen through which tubes are inserted. A miniature camera at the end of one tube enables the surgeon to see into the body and guide instruments through the other tubes to perform minor surgery.

With the robotic device, called the da Vinci Surgical System, the surgeon performs the operation while sitting at a console nearby the operating table. The surgeon views a motionless image, magnified up to 20 times, of the patient and operative site on a video monitor.

From the console, the surgeon controls three robotic arms holding surgical tools above the operating table. The robotic technology translates the surgeon's movements into precise, real-time movements of the surgical instruments inside the patient. A built-in "wrist" at the end of the tools helps the surgeon to perform more exact and intricate motions without the natural tremors that accompany a surgeon's own hands.

In clinical studies, results of 113 surgeries for gall bladder or gastroesophageal reflux disease using the robotic device were found comparable in safety and effectiveness to the results in 132 patients who underwent standard laparoscopic surgery. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

ROBOTS Help Surgeon Perform More Precise Surgery
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.