Maryland, Delaware on the Forefront with License Reciprocity

By Mueller, Gene | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 6, 2000 | Go to article overview

Maryland, Delaware on the Forefront with License Reciprocity


Mueller, Gene, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


How about an "attaboy" for Maryland and Delaware, two states that allow hunters to shoot snow geese in either jurisdiction on their regular, normal resident licenses. OK, so for now the license reciprocity applies only to those pesky snow geese, but who knows where this might lead?

Come to think of it, why can't all states do at least the next-door-neighbor reciprocity thing? Instead of losing revenues from expensive non-resident licenses, reciprocity would attract participants that will spend a wad of cash on all kinds of things - in the long run benefiting the host state's economy.

Meanwhile, Delaware and Maryland got together because the continental number of greater snow geese increased from less than 50,000 birds in 1965 to more than 800,000 in 1999. Wildlife officials had to come up with a solution to a population problem that already has seriously damaged the fragile Arctic tundras used by the geese as breeding grounds. If the snow geese continue to increase, the tundras may become so damaged they will never be able to repair themselves.

The normally white-with-black-wing-tips snow geese are found this time of year throughout the middle Atlantic region where they "grub" for vegetation below marsh surfaces, possibly turning the marsh into submerged wetlands that can negatively impact terns, egrets, ducks and Atlantic brant (a type of goose).

To hunt snow geese in Delaware, Maryland hunters must have their state's hunting license, a 2000 Federal Migratory Bird Stamp, a 2000 Delaware duck stamp, and a free Delaware hunting information permit (HIP) that can be obtained by calling 800/938-5263.

Family sues over mountain lion attack - The Scripps Howard News Service reports from Denver that the family of a French youngster who was attacked by a mountain lion at Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado three years ago now is suing the National Park Service.

The family of Raphael Degrave of Bougival, France, alleges that park officials failed to protect them from a "known risk" posed by the mountain lion.

The attack occurred on July 14, 1997, around 10:45 a.m., while the Degrave family was vacationing in the park. Lawyers for the family contend there had been three previous sightings of a mountain lion at the park that week, the last coming 15 minutes before the attack.

After a first sighting on July 9, Park Service employees tried loud noises and pepper spray to keep the lion from approaching people in the park, the suit states. A second sighting on July 11 prompted the Park Service to close the Park Point area where the lion had been seen, the suit contends. …

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Maryland, Delaware on the Forefront with License Reciprocity
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