Female College Students Split on Morality of Abortion Pill

By Noto, Melanie | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 6, 2000 | Go to article overview

Female College Students Split on Morality of Abortion Pill


Noto, Melanie, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The recent approval of the RU-486 "abortion pill" has renewed the abortion debate on college campuses, as students and health officials explore the implications of a drug that changes the way pregnancies are ended.

RU-486, which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in September, is expected to land in doctors' offices within a few weeks. A slight majority of college students favor the pill, but at the same time they desire more restrictions on abortion.

A recent survey shows that women aged 20-24 have the highest percentage of abortions in America. The Family Planning Perspectives national survey of 10,000 abortion patients in 1994-1995 revealed almost one-third of American abortions (32.8 percent) were performed on women of this age group, from all education backgrounds.

Like the general populace, students are split on the topic.

Erin Hueston, a senior at Wittenberg University in Ohio, applauded the FDA approval.

"It is a less-invasive procedure and women will no longer have to face protesters outside of clinics, risking their lives to have an abortion," the political science major said.

But Jennifer Bradley, a sophomore business major at Georgetown, felt that the move to make abortions accessible in pill form will result in an increase in aborted pregnancies.

"The approval was obviously a huge setback for pro-life organizations because people are going to compartmentalize abortion," the 20-year-old Southboro, Mass., resident said.

Two polls illustrate collegiate uneasiness about the issue. A Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and MTV poll of 18- to 24-year-olds taken in July revealed a large majority of young people oppose making abortion illegal under any circumstances.

Yet, 47 percent of the 603 young adults polled opposed the release of RU-486 in the United States.

Similarly, an October poll of Florida voters conducted by the New York Times' Florida newspapers found that 18- to 29-year-olds were most in favor of RU-486. However, this group also ranked first in favoring more restrictive abortion laws.

Baltimore pro-life activist Frederica Mathewes-Green, the mother of three college-age children, attributed this contradiction to a younger generation that dislikes the idea of abortion, but considers RU-486 to be less graphic and violent than surgical abortions.

"I know that over recent years the percentage of freshmen opposing abortion has grown," Mrs. Mathewes-Green said. However, many students in this group turn pro-choice by graduation, she added.

Most students agreed that college women want the option of a private, nonsurgical abortion. Elisabeth Brown, a Georgetown University junior, said that abortion has become less of a feminist issue for college women. Instead, the procedure becomes more of an escape from the "scary" reality of pregnancy.

"A lot of college women are pro-choice because they say, `If I was in that position, I would want to have a choice,' " the 20-year-old from Albany, N.Y., said. "It's not a liberating thing."

Heather Storer, a student at the University of California in Santa Cruz, predicts RU-486 will change the whole abortion controversy in America.

"It alters the scope of conflict around the abortion debate, shifting it from a public to a private issue," Miss Storer said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Female College Students Split on Morality of Abortion Pill
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.