Hotlist

By Manetas, Miltos | Artforum International, November 2000 | Go to article overview

Hotlist


Manetas, Miltos, Artforum International


ARTFORUM IS SUCH AN UN-NEEN MAGAZINE. (If you don't know what that means, go to www.neen.org immediately.) A structure as clean as the proverbial brightly lit cube and heavy on heavy-duty content, the magazine's as big, classic, and white as the Acropolis. So recommending web-sites to Artforum readers makes me feel like I'm serving fast food in a church. And because the Web is nothing but info," I'm offering up info on info--which seems about as fitting for Artforum as a piece on New British Art for Cosmo. But I may be wrong, so here are some WWW musts, places that aren't art or even arty but "alive" in a way only computer civilization can simulate--in short, places that are totally neen.

The HyperArchive of the Info-Mac Archive hyperarchive.Ics.mit.edu

Every day, new programs for Mac are posted to this page. You're free to download them or just read the abstracts, which, in my opinion, are a new genre of literature. The HyperArchive will remind you how happy and enlightened we all felt going to contemporary art institutions and galleries in the old century. Visit the site often enough, and you may find something that's in short supply in the those venues today: new ideas.

Emulation

www.emulation.net

Discover the beauty of an operating system that's operating as the guest of another operating system. Observe your Mac or PC travestying a Palm Pilot or an old Atari. Forget the games and applications, just watch your computer's unnaturally intriguing behavior. Philosophically speaking, emulation is the modus operandi of our time.

Active Worlds

www.activeworlds.com

Wander around using an avatar body in a pseudo- 3-D world teeming with visitors and "buildings." Build a home somewhere or buy an entire world for anywhere between $10 and $1,150 a year. …

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