Roberta Silva

By Pasini, Francesca | Artforum International, November 2000 | Go to article overview

Roberta Silva


Pasini, Francesca, Artforum International


STUDIO CASOLI

As communication spreads via the Internet and computers, the resistance to declaring one's emotional horizons crumbles. This is not "postmodern neo-romanticism," but rather the freedom to give shape, symbol, interpretation to the tie between mind and body, sentiment and reason. In recent years some astute theoretical interpretations have appeared in feminist thought with regard to this subject, and now the visual arts are announcing that women and men need figures and signs to give a name to this change. Knowledge means knowing the emotions, keeping them in a form that neither sanctifies nor monumentalizes them, but reveals the multiform and unstable profile of their physical life. Roberta Silva has said: "I never repress my childhood memories," but the "text" that she laid out here was very different from a memory that might be entered in a diary. In the first room, two large sculptures of transparent natural resin, entitled Lacrime d'artista (Tears of the artist), 1998-2000, welcomed the viewer, but they ha d nothing to do with a stereotype of grief. There was something playful and theatrical about the work: two rears, positioned at the artist's own eye level; two waterfalls crystallized on the floor. The liquid that springs from crying becomes a workable material with its own consistency, almost a physical testimony to the energy unleashed by a strong, profound feeling that cannot be avoided but is not just a symbol of grief.

Sculpture is Silva's passion, and for her, the origins of three-dimensionality lie in light. …

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