"Mixing Memory and Desire"

By Reust, Hans Rudolf | Artforum International, November 2000 | Go to article overview

"Mixing Memory and Desire"


Reust, Hans Rudolf, Artforum International


KUNSTMUSEUM

The more virtuality encroaches on daily life, the more art seems to want to reassure itself of its real space by way of exhibition architecture. The new Kunstmuseum Luzern, housed within Jean Nouvel's Kultur- und Kongresszentrum (Culture and convention center), answers this trend by refracting it: In the middle of the city, between the train station and lakeshore, under a gigantic fiat roof, Nouvel has built a fascinating sequence of volumes and cuts that look as though simulated on a computer screen. The lake is reflected in the prominent floating plane of the roof, while the cut to the sky frames the postcard landscape like a proscenium. Every view from the building tends to be a tableau. It is all the more surprising that this spectacular exterior holds inside it a clearly delimited museum cube of Lutheran sobriety, its 20,000 square feet divided in turn into a relentlessly cool series of white cubes that renounce all architectural seductiveness. Low corridors between high, right-angled spaces and evenly d istributed light support the pure focus on art.

In its inaugural exhibition, "Mixing Memory and Desire-- Wunsch und Erinnerung," what Nouvel calls the "nudite des espaces" (nudity of space) of the Kunstmuseum Luzern had its depths sounded by the works of twenty-five contemporary and five historical artists. Here, the traditionally distinct agendas of a Kunsthalle and a museum overlapped, as in Douglas Gordon's contribution, where he created a new work by assembling his own retrospective in one room: Pretty Much Every Video and Film Work From About 1992 Until Now. To Be Seen on Monitors. Some With Headphones. Others Run Silently and All Simultaneously, Other highlights were Tacita Dean's film Sound Mirrors, 1999, some compellingly oppressive video projections by Smith/Stewart, a series of paintings by Brice Marden, and, above all, the most recent group of paintings by Raoul de Keyser, with their fleeting encounters between free, minimal forms and the painterly ground. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

"Mixing Memory and Desire"
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.