Annika Eriksson

By Stjernstedt, Mats | Artforum International, November 2000 | Go to article overview

Annika Eriksson


Stjernstedt, Mats, Artforum International


ANDREHN-SCHIPTJENKO

Annika Eriksson's exhibition here in 1996 comprised a single film projection, Stockholm Postmen's Orchestra. Footage showed an amateur band playing away merrily, the musicians all postal workers who had assembled in the gallery at the artist's request to play just as they normally would after working hours. The point at which Eriksson's own work crossed with the postal workers' instrumental enterprise was located in the fact that, in accordance with her wishes, the orchestra performed a current pop hit, Portishead's "Sour Times"--presumably a departure from their regular repertoire.

Eriksson's most recent exhibition, The Construction, 2000, gave the impression, at first, that the artist couldn't quite get everything ready in time for the opening. Cluttered to the bursting point with a skeletal timber construction, a building project made of rough, untreated planks and chipboard, the gallery seemed to be humming with the activity of construction work. Rhythmical sounds of hammering and sawing were every now and then drowned by powerful, pulsating music churned out by what sounded like a transistor radio somewhere in the rear of the room. Looking behind the wooden construction's facade, however, made it clear that the activity one heard was in fact finished--but recorded and preserved in the form of three and a half hours of real-time documentary footage projected onto a wooden screen erected inside the set; rough wooden benches were provided for spectators.

The piece extends Eriksson's interest in those social pacts that bring people together and the creativity to which, by acting concertedly, people give expression, though now the focus has shifted from leisure to work. …

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