Ventura Publisher - a Review of Xerox's Desktop Publishing Software

By Hane, Carl | Online, November 1988 | Go to article overview

Ventura Publisher - a Review of Xerox's Desktop Publishing Software


Hane, Carl, Online


Editor's Note: Two articles about using Ventura Publisher in a library setting, written by Pamala Danziger, were published in July 1988 ONLINE and September 1987 ONLINE. Another article of interest is Steve Cisler's "Desktop Publishing In Libraries," in September 1987 ONLINE. See also Bruce McClelland's article in this issue of ONLINE, title"From Logon To Typeset Document In Under Ten Minutes." All of these articles discuss specific information center applications for Ventura Publisher, which is highly recommended in this review by Carl Hane. -HG

Xerox's Ventura Publisher is one of those handful of programs that, in a world of advertising hype, delivers more than promised, and in every way lives up to its well deserved reputation. While not an application for the computer novice, experienced users looking for a fast, graphically oriented, page layout program with professional looking results, will find all the answers here, and just when you thought it couldn't be done on an IBM PC.

Ventura Publisher belongs to an often misunderstood, or at least misadvertised, family of applications used for desktop publishing. The whole notion of desktop publishing has evolved in many ways like that of its older kin, word processing.

In the early days of computers, text manipulation was done with line editors. These simple programs allowed the user to lay down text one line at a time, in much the same manner as we enter DOS commands on a single line today A complete document was made up of many lines, each of which could be called up by number for editing. To give the document a more unified appearance, a separate program was used to format and then print the finished document. Formatters adjusted the margins, line, and character spacing, numbered the pages, and sent the document to the printer. When the first programs to combine the edit and format functions were released in the form of word processors, there seemed little left for improvement. Here was a method to enter and print letters, articles, even whole books, using a computer and daisy wheel printer which looked as good as any typewritten manuscript.

Most users were satisfied with the current state of document preparation, until Hewlett-Packard introduced the first affordable laser printer which could output text nearly as sharp as the best daisy wheel printer, and graphics far superior to any affordable dot matrix printer. But making use of all of these features was beyond the capabilities of any current word processing package. Numerous products evolved that interacted with a word processor to allow mixed fonts or graphic inserts within a document. These add-on products were the beginnings of desktop publishing and in many ways similar to the early text formatters. A document was prepared with a standard word processor and then processed with the add-on product to yield the final integration of text and graphics, cumbersome at best, and always requiring a great amount of experimentation. WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) was a seldom fulfilled promise. Microspacing, point and pitch discrepancies, and screen dimensions always seemed to create some surprising printed result not even hinted at on the screen. Not until the introduction of programs like Aldus Corporation's PageMaker for the Macintosh, were all of the functions of desktop publishing brought together in a single program with true WYSIWYG.

Ventura Publisher is Xerox's answer to PageMaker on a PC, and while Aldus Corporation and others have since ported similar products over to the IBM PC environment, none to date have matched the overall value and quality of output of Xerox's superbly polished product.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

Ventura Publisher is a professional page layout system that combines, in a single printed document, text, charts, scanned images, or drawings imported from other programs. The finished document can be output to a dot matrix or laser printer or sent directly to either PostScript or Interpress typesetters at resolutions up to 2540 dots per inch. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Ventura Publisher - a Review of Xerox's Desktop Publishing Software
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.