Advisory Council Completes 2000 Futures Process for Investing in Communities, Looks to 2001

By Cheek, Dorothy | Nation's Cities Weekly, December 4, 2000 | Go to article overview

Advisory Council Completes 2000 Futures Process for Investing in Communities, Looks to 2001


Cheek, Dorothy, Nation's Cities Weekly


The National League of Cities (NLC) Advisory Council is releasing the results of its 2000 Futures Process during the Congress of Cities in Boston. That process yielded a statement on Investing in Communities and a coalition of 26 national organizations that will advocate the statement.

When the Advisory Council meets on Wednesday, December 6, it also will kick off the next cycle of activities for the 2001 Futures topic, which targets the key roles that land use decisions have in "Building Quality Communities." NLC Second Vice President Karen Anderson, mayor of Minnetonka, Minn., will share her thoughts and ideas for the topic.

On Wednesday afternoon, the Advisory Council also will join with the NLC Board of Directors to review the year of activities conducted as part of the NLC President's agenda on Undoing Racism. The 1999 NLC Futures Report, Undoing Racism: Fairness and Justice in America's Cities and Towns provided the framework for that agenda. NLC President Bob Knight will present highlights of these accomplishments. There also will be discussions of plans for sustaining the agenda for 2001 and beyond.

2000 Futures Process

At the request of NLC First Vice President Dennis Archer, and under the leadership of Advisory Council Co-Chairs Connie Sprynczynatyk, executive director of the North Dakota League of Cities, and Woodrow Stanley, mayor of Flint, Mich., the Advisory Council undertook a different Futures Process for 2000. That process focused on bringing together national organizations whose members have a stake in the successful futures of the nation's cities and towns in order to form a coalition around a shared advocacy agenda.

Last March, Archer outlined his vision and goals for the Investing in Communities futures process. He called upon the Advisory Council and NLC's members to be premier spokespersons for America's cities and towns. He suggested that NLC build upon the relationships it has developed with key groups to support efforts on behalf of our nation's communities.

During the year, Advisory Council members met with and solicited input from many national organizations. This process resulted in the development of the statement that now serves as the basis for building the coalition. The statement, entitled, "Investing in Cities: A Shared Vision and a Call to Action," was reviewed by the NLC Board of Directors and forwarded to the coalition members for sign on. As of November 30, 26 organizations have joined the Investing in Communities coalition (see box). …

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Advisory Council Completes 2000 Futures Process for Investing in Communities, Looks to 2001
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