Will Cancer Spread? Sound out NMR

By Raloff, Janet | Science News, June 18, 1988 | Go to article overview

Will Cancer Spread? Sound out NMR


Raloff, Janet, Science News


Will cancer spread? Sound out NMR

A Canadian scientist has adapted a standard chemical assaying technique to identify whether solid cancerous tumors have the ability to spawn secondary growths, called metastases. In a recenlty completed study of 200 human adenocarcinomas -- 70 percent colon cancers, 30 percent breast tumors -- Ian C.P. Smith correctly diagnosed 27 cancers as having apparently "no metastatic potential." It is significant, he notes, that none of his diagnoses falsely predicted that a cancer would not spread.

If such metastatic diagnoses prove as reliable as the preliminary studies suggest, they might one day offer physicians the option of prescribing postsurgical radiation or chemotherapy directed only at the primary tumor, says Smith, director of the Canadian National Research Council's Division of Biological Sciences in Ottawa. Thus some patients might qualify for a more benign therapy than the treatment used to tackle unseen metastases today, he says.

Over the past decade, most major hospitals have adopted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, also known as magnetic resonance imaging, as a noninvasive tool for peering into the body. But chemists have used NMR spectroscopy -- which can identify and quantify chemical species within complex samples -- for at least 30 years. And a technique based on this spectroscopic side of the technology lies behind Smith's work, which he described in Toronto last week at the Third Chemical Congress of North America.

Smith irradiated samples (from tumors removed during surgery) with radiofrequency radiation. This energy "excited" nuclei of certain atoms in the cancerous tissue to a higher energy. When the NMR beam shut off, the atoms "relaxed" to their initial energy state. Each chemical constituent has a unique relaxation profile, or signature, that allows its identification.

Smith focused on relaxation rates for the methylene (CH. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Will Cancer Spread? Sound out NMR
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.