Calendars Greet New Year with Distinctive Themes, Designs

Korea Times (Seoul, Korea), December 29, 2000 | Go to article overview

Calendars Greet New Year with Distinctive Themes, Designs


The first of January. It is a season for New Year celebrations and New Year resolutions. For Korean families, it is a time to get together for a New Year's bow and a bowl of ``ttokkuk.''

Another unmistakable sign of the New Year is the glossy, brand new calendars on desks and walls.

Since the dawn of civilization, calendars have helped people to know when to plant and harvest their crops and when important dates regarding religious services and festivals came around.

Most modernized countries now use the Gregorian calendar, which Pope Gregory XIII devised in 1582, in order to correct the Julian calendar established by Julius Caesar in 46 B.C.

However, over the centuries, there have been various other ways to keep track of the days and months besides the Gregorian calendar. In some parts of the world, there still are. For instance, in Korea, though it will soon officially be 2001, it will also be the year 4334, if we calculate the years according to the calendar based on the year Tangun established Old Choson.

Also, until about a century ago, Korea used the lunar calendar. Korea first started going by the Gregorian in 1895, when Nov. 17, 1895 by the lunar calendar was designated as Jan. 1, 1896 on the solar calendar.

Currently in Korea, about 70 to 80 million copies are printed every year and an additional 3 million are ordered for the Korean residents in Japan.

It is estimated that one household has an average of approximately three calendars.

However, Koreans usually do not buy their own calendars. In the past, when new calendars were not very easy to come by, Koreans gave them as presents to family and friends.

Although calendars are now common, the tradition lives on. Today, companies, banks and department stores still order numerous copies of calendars to give out to their customers and business partners.

However, according to companies selling calendars, sales have reduced considerably from last year, by at least 10 percent.

One reason is the increased number of people using pocket diaries and electronic notepads. Online calendars and diaries provided on the Internet also lessen the need for calendars printed on paper.

For instance, at the site, http://members.tripod.lycos.co.kr/calm, you can download a web calendar onto your computer screen. Other sites that provide online calendars and diaries are www.myplan.co.kr, www.myshell.com, www.telmetellme.com and www.myinternetdiary.com.

You can also download free calendars with photos of North Korea at the site of DPRKorea Infobank (www.dprkorea.com). There are three kinds to choose from -- Paektu Mountain, the Pyongyang acrobatic troupe and scenes from North Korean movies.

However, many companies continue to make old-fashioned off-line paper calendars. One such company is Hongil Artistic Printing Company, which has a calendar-making history dating back 30 years.

You can see some of their old designs at http://www.artq.co.kr.

Lee Heung-woo, senior executive director of Hongil, said that nowadays, people prefer small, handy desktop calendars to bulky wall calendars.

``It's probably because more and more people need calendars with spaces for jotting down their schedules. People also want their own personal calendars to put on their desks, rather than sharing a big one hanging on the wall with everyone else,'' said Lee.

``Also, due to the economic hardship, people are now asking for more plain, practical calendars, simply with numbers on them, instead of those with lots of colorful and flamboyant pictures,'' he added.

Among those with pictures, however, the most popular are pictures of Korean landscapes.

``People like photos that show clean nature scenes. In fact, they comprise 50 percent of all calendars that are ordered,'' said Lee.

One reason might be that urbanites living in a maze of dull gray buildings long to see at least a little bit of nature in photos. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Calendars Greet New Year with Distinctive Themes, Designs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.