Acknowledgments

The Hemingway Review, Fall 2000 | Go to article overview

Acknowledgments


With two special issues celebrating the 1999 Hemingway centennial, it's been far too long since we took space to acknowledge the many scholars who have contributed their valuable time and special expertise to The Hemingway Review. The following individuals read and evaluated manuscripts for the journal from Fall 1998 through Spring 2000:

Rick Ardinger (Idaho Humanities Council); Jamie Barlowe (U Toledo); Jackson Benson (ret. San Diego State); Mary K. Bercaw (Mystic Seaport Museum); David Blackmore (Jersey City State); Gerry Brenner (U Montana); Jacqueline Brogan (Notre Dame); Rose Marie Burwell (Northern Illinois); Suzanne Clark (U Oregon); Milton Cohen (U Texas Dallas); Nancy Comley (Queens College, CUNY); Kirk Curnutt (Troy State); Joseph DeFalco (ret. Marquette); Albert J. DeFazio III (George Washington); Robert DeMott (Ohio U); Scott Donaldson (ret. William and Mary); Carl Eby (U South Carolina Beaufort); David Ferrero (Harvard); Noel Riley Fitch (UCLA); Robert Fleming (ret. U New Mexico); Joseph Flora (U North Carolina Chapel Hill); Larry Grimes (Bethany); Howard Hannum (La Salle); Peter Hays (U California Davis); Jennifer Haytock (U North Carolina Chapel Hill); Gloria Holland (U South Florida); John M. Howell (Southern Illinois); Allen Josephs (U West Florida); Hilary Justice (U Chicago); J. Gerald Kennedy (Louisiana State); Keneth Kinnamon (U Arkansas); Toni Knott (Independent Scholar); Fern Kory (Eastern Illinois); Robert Paul Lamb (Purdue); Leonard Leff (Oklahoma State); Robert W. …

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