Good Coaches Let Kids Swing Away Sports Camps Boost Confidence of Young Players as They Gain Skills

By Berens, Brian A. | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 7, 1999 | Go to article overview

Good Coaches Let Kids Swing Away Sports Camps Boost Confidence of Young Players as They Gain Skills


Berens, Brian A., Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Brian A. Berens Daily Herald Staff Writer

Positive motivation is top priority at a number of children's athletic camps in DuPage County this summer.

At the White Sox Training Camp, held last week at Summerlakes Park in Warrenville, coaches Mike Morgan and Mike Grunloh created a tough yet nurturing atmosphere.

"At our camp, a love of the game and dedication to it come first," said Morgan, a high school coach on Chicago's South Side. "We believe in coach and student, together as one."

Seven campers ranging in age from 7 to 14 spent their mornings learning the fundamentals of throwing, base running and batting.

"I learned how to lead off on the bases and KASH, a throwing technique using the knee, ankle, shoulders and hips," Matt Kinsella of Warrenville said. "You should always point to whoever you're throwing to."

Adam Rudy of Warrenville was excited that he learned how to steal a base, and Matt Harms of Warrenville said he already wants to join the camp next year.

Morgan and Grunloh constantly encouraged questions to enhance the learning process.

"If you don't understand something, we're here to clarify it," Morgan said.

To avoid deflating the kids' confidence, the coaches made a point of asking the kids what they did wrong instead of telling them.

Bill Hopkins of Wheaton, a parent to one of the campers, was impressed with the coaching style.

"They teach the mental aspects of the game," Hopkins said. "The physical aspects are one thing, but thinking on the field is equally important."

Hopkins also said the coach-to- player ratio was imperative.

"Because there's only seven kids, they get a lot of hands-on, individual instruction," Hopkins said. "With seven kids, it's easier to keep them moving, and it helps to break the kids up."

Cris Kinsella-Naber of Warrenville said the coaches inspired the kids to be better ball players.

"They keep the kids moving and hustling all the time," Kinsella-Naber said. "It's actually a rule to keep running. My kid, Matt, came home so excited and it was 100 degrees outside."

The Chicago Bulls Basketball Schools also are making their way around the Chicago area.

The camps, aimed at boys and girls ages 6 to 14, teach kids the fundamentals of basketball.

"We don't just roll the ball out onto the court and put the kids in a five-on-five situation," said head coach Bobby Hansen, a former guard for the Chicago Bulls. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Good Coaches Let Kids Swing Away Sports Camps Boost Confidence of Young Players as They Gain Skills
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.