Splashed Shoes and Memories of John F. Kennedy Jr.'s Smile

By Silverman, Ruth | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 25, 1999 | Go to article overview

Splashed Shoes and Memories of John F. Kennedy Jr.'s Smile


Silverman, Ruth, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Ruth Silverman Daily Herald Correspondent

Would John F. Kennedy Jr. have run for public office?

I had the opportunity to ask him that and much more while strolling through the Art Institute's Garden Court at the party sponsored by his George Magazine during Chicago's '96 Democratic Convention.

He cocked his head and a small smile creased his lips as he said, "Well, for now, I love my magazine and I love what I'm doing."

It was the cock of the head and the smile, as much as his words that came to mind as announcements of his disappearance and death this week flooded the news. After a bumpy start to his legal career, he exuded confidence when talking about his new political magazine, which he hoped would infuse new blood into the political scene.

But there were other sides to him as well. He wore them as gracefully as he did the tailored suits and silk ties, the casual shorts and T-shirts, and the bathing suits that all contributed to the image that got him voted the "Sexiest Man in America," by a People Magazine poll.

He was playful with friends and fiercely devoted to his family. He didn't seem to mind that I looked on, pen in hand, as he and long-time friend and aspiring actor Merrill Holtzman engaged in some schoolboy hi-jinks.

As they gestured wildly to make a point, their glasses filled with the exotic drink of the evening, the negroni splashed them and even my new patent leather shoes. …

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