Smoking's Not Cool, Singer Tells Students Richard Marx Says Latest Pop Bands Are 'Really Health Conscious'

By Larson, Kristin | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 19, 1999 | Go to article overview

Smoking's Not Cool, Singer Tells Students Richard Marx Says Latest Pop Bands Are 'Really Health Conscious'


Larson, Kristin, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Kristin Larson Daily Herald Staff Writer

Richard Marx is best known for his late 1980s hits like "Don't Mean Nothing," but the pop singer is also becoming famous for something else - trying to stop kids from smoking.

As part of Thursday's Great American Smokeout, Marx visited students at Woodland Middle School in Gurnee and Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire to talk about the dangers of cigarettes and tobacco and how "uncool" it is for young people to light up.

"The guys you look up to right now, 'N Sync, the Backstreet Boys, they're all really health conscious," Marx told about 50 Woodland seventh-graders.

"Some people might sugarcoat this, but the chances are somebody in this room is going to die from cigarettes," said the singer, who lost his grandmother and aunt to smoking-related illnesses and who has never smoked himself.

The 36-year-old Marx, who lives in the Lake Forest area, said unlike 20 years ago, smoking is no longer cool among musicians and entertainers.

And he spared no examples on why smoking is so unappealing - from possible death to smelly clothes - and told teens the tobacco industry is "counting on (them) getting hooked."

"If every young person was as educated as you guys are, that would cripple the tobacco industry," he said.

Hands shot up in the audience when they heard how Marx lost his grandmother to emphysema 10 years ago. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Smoking's Not Cool, Singer Tells Students Richard Marx Says Latest Pop Bands Are 'Really Health Conscious'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.