Obituaries

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 14, 1999 | Go to article overview

Obituaries


In Loving Memory of

Robert E. Whitchurch

I wake each morning & during my deepest confusion and greatest despair ...I look for you and you're not there.

Your beauty was blinding. Your incredible strength, wisdom & advise fills my mind and helps me to sustain.

It's not necessarily how long we have with one but, the depth of that love we are fortunate enough to share.

We know you were a great man for 35 years. It showed in every aspect of your life.

I finally realize grief does not go away-it can only to be managed, day by day, until this emptiness is filled..................................... when we are reunited with this one very special, unique individual...his name is

ROBERT WHITCHURCH

We miss you always!

Your sister, Lisa Whitchurch

Mom, Dad, Jeff & Bob

Mabel Bartlett of Roscoe, Ill.

Services for Mabel Bartlett, 85, formerly of Green Bay, Wis., will be held at 9:30 a.m. Monday, at Laird Funeral Home, 310 S. State St., Elgin. Rev. Marcia Johnson will officiate.

Born Dec. 30, 1913, in Chicago, the daughter of William and Karen (nee Rassmussen) Blevin, she passed away Thursday, Aug. 12, 1999, in Roscoe. Burial will be in Glen Oak Cemetery, Hillside.

Prior to her retirement, Mabel had owned and operated the Arkdale Bay Rest Resort in Arkdale, Wis. from 1972 until 1998.

Survivors include her grandchildren, Elmer (Lee) Bartlett of Green Bay, William (Linda) Bartlett of Roscoe, Thomas (Linda) Bartlett of Lake In The Hills, Wayne (Zetta) Bartlett of Rockford, Bryan (Karen) Peterson of Arkdale, Robert Bartlett of Texas, Jeffrey (Tresa) Bartlett of Oconto, Wis. and Tracey (Beverly) Bartlett of Columbus, Ohio; 30 great-grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Elmer, in 1984; son, Bruce Bartlett, in 1987; grandsons, Bruce Bartlett Jr., in 1979 and Eric Bartlett, in 1993; and brother-in-law, William Dobson.

Visitation will be from 3 to 9 p.m. Sunday, at the funeral home.

Memorials may be made to the VNA Hospice of Rockford, Ill.

For information, (847) 741-8800.

Marianne C. Brahar of Wheeling

Services for Marianne C. Brahar (nee Machuletz), 71, formerly a 33-year Arlington Heights resident, will be held at 10 a.m. today, at Glueckert Funeral Home, Ltd., 1520 N. Arlington Heights Rd. (four blocks south of Palatine Rd.), Arlington Heights.

Born July 7, 1928, in Germany, she died Wednesday, Aug. 11, 1999, at Northwest Community Healthcare in Arlington Heights. Interment will be private.

A five-year Wheeling resident, she was a member of the Berlinger Baeren.

Survivors include her husband, Michael; children, Christine (Greg) Mac Intyre of Buffalo Grove and Josef (Marnie) Brahar of Wheeling; grandchildren, Jessica and Madalyn Brahar; and siblings, Claus (Anni) Machuletz of Englewood, Fla. and Gundi (late Sam) Hryhorkiw of Palatine.

For information, (847) 253-0168.

Velma L. Campani

See notice under North Suburban Obituaries.

Velma L. Campani of Lake Zurich

Services for Velma L. Campani (nee Padavic), 84, will begin with prayers at 9:30 a.m. today, at Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home, 185 E. Northwest Highway, Palatine, and will continue with Mass at 10 a.m. at St. Thomas of Villanova Church, Anderson and Williams Drive, Palatine.

Born June 13, 1915, in Iowa, she died Wednesday, Aug. 11, 1999, at Northwest Community Healthcare, Arlington Heights. Entombment will be in All Saints Mausoleum.

Mrs. Campani had worked as a legal secretary.

She was the loving mother of the late Janet (the late Raphael) Nixon; cherished grandmother of Jolene (Gregory) Bowling, Martin (Dawn) Nixon and Michelle (Richard) Emrick; great-grandmother of Nate, Jesse and Maria Emrick, and Shotzy, Gonzo and Spence; best friend and great-grandmother of Katie Bowling; dear sister of Emil (Patricia) Padavic and the late Mary Padavic; fond aunt of many nieces and nephews; and friend to all. …

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