As Seuss Goes Highbrow, We Can Carpe the Grinch

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 10, 1998 | Go to article overview

As Seuss Goes Highbrow, We Can Carpe the Grinch


Byline: Burt Constable

If you like Seuss creations, there's lots of places to see 'em,

no longer just in books, but at shops, malls and museums.

It makes good business sense to let the Cat in the Hat in.

How better to explain why the Grinch now speaks in Latin?

* * *

On the shelves of a warehouse in a Wauconda business park, nestled among highbrow books such as Vergil's "The Aeneid" and "Cicero: Pro Archia Poeta Oratio" lurks a most unusual copy of "How the Grinch Stole Christmas."

Seuss has gone Latin with Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers' new translation of the classic Christmas tale into Quomodo Invidiosulus nomine Grinchus Christi natalem abrogaverit.

While it's all Greek to most Americans, Latin provides a nice living for publishers Lou and Marie Bolchazy and their staff of 10. No dead language, this, say the husband and wife from Lake Barrington Shores.

A professor at Loyola University, Lou Bolchazy wasn't satisfied with the textbook translations of classic Latin and Greek literature, so he started his own publishing company.

Founded in 1980 with the publishing of a cheap, stapled copy of "Rome and Her Kings," Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers grows every year and now boasts 150 titles sold worldwide and an annual gross income of $750,000, Marie Bolchazy says. (The Internet address is www.bolchazy.com.)

The company sells Latin teaching programs to colleges, high schools and hundreds of home-schoolers, says Marie Bolchazy, rattling off statistics showing Latin is not just the language of 100-year-old priests and Senator-elect Peter Fitzgerald, but on the rise.

"When we did the Grinch we had to be faithful to our core group," Marie Bolchazy says.

But Dr. Seuss uses words not found in ancient Rome. So translators (Drs. Jennifer and Terence Tunberg at the University of Kentucky) had to improvise. …

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