Lombard Store Caters to Military History Buffs

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 15, 1998 | Go to article overview

Lombard Store Caters to Military History Buffs


Byline: Diane Dassow

A new Lombard store takes the whole "Men are from Mars" idea seriously.

It's called Men At Arms, and offers products connected with military history. But women figure prominently in owner Bill Krieg's scheme.

"The whole idea of the store was to take a guy-type interest and set up a retail store where women would feel comfortable coming in and buying a gift," he said.

So Krieg established a combination art gallery and retail store where the glass shelves gleam as in any fancy gift shop and where there's no dust to be found.

There's no way you can mistake this for a hobby or military surplus store. He doesn't handle common military items, like canteens or army jackets.

You're more likely to find supplies for a very specialized interest. The shop appeals to people who like to re-create historic events as war games, dioramas or vignettes, he said.

Since opening Oct. 1, he has already attracted a clientele from a 50-mile radius.

Krieg also carries a large inventory of painted miniatures and collectibles from the French and Indian War, Revolutionary War, Civil War and World War II, as well as some from World War I and Vietnam. Some items are offered on consignment.

He also has brought in a wide range of limited edition artwork by renowned artists - names like Tom Freeman, whose paintings of naval battles hang in government buildings. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lombard Store Caters to Military History Buffs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.