Elementary Teachers Still Lagging on Pay Scale Salaries in High School Districts Set the Pace

By Mask, Teresa | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 7, 1998 | Go to article overview

Elementary Teachers Still Lagging on Pay Scale Salaries in High School Districts Set the Pace


Mask, Teresa, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Teresa Mask Daily Herald Staff Writer

A teacher fresh out of Illinois State University who lands a job in Glen Ellyn's Glenbard High School District 87 would be paid $35,698 this year.

Another teacher from that same university who signs on at nearby Queen Bee Elementary District 16 would make about $9,000 less at $26,354.

In Palatine Township Elementary District 15 and Palatine-Schaumburg High School District 211, the disparity for beginning teachers is about $6,000.

And when teachers from those districts have been on the job for about five years, and earned a master's degree, the gap in pay widens to nearly $12,000 a year.

Elementary teachers in Libertyville, however, are holding their own. The teachers are among the highest-paid elementary teachers in the state - their salaries closely mirroring the neighboring high school district.

Mark Friedman, superintendent of Libertyville Elementary District 70, said it's a plum he used to hire 17 new teachers this fall.

"We are right up there with the high school district," he said. "I think it's something to feel good about."

Everybody has theories about why high school teachers often make more than their elementary counterparts. And with last month's strike in District 87 resulting in high-end teachers making $85,000 after three years, the debate rages.

Many say it has historical relevance: elementary teachers have almost always been women bringing in the family's second income, therefore a sexist society paid them less and that has yet to change.

Others suggest more high school teachers pursue advanced degrees, pushing them up on their salary scales.

Some high school teachers argue they have the more difficult job, teach tougher subjects - which they are expected to master - and handle more disciplinary problems, so they should be paid more.

A former kindergarten teacher and now a college professor, William Ayers has no problem with what some would call lofty salaries for high school teachers.

But he says elementary teachers deserve more.

"Teaching kindergarten was an intellectual challenge of huge proportion," he tells anyone who questions the talent, drive, energy and brains it takes to do the job.

He tells his lawyer friends that being an elementary teacher was the most "intellectually demanding" job he's ever had and dares them to try it if they ever tire of their "six-figure salaries."

Ayers, a professor of education at the University of Illinois in Chicago, says an elementary teacher's job is more complicated than what secondary teachers do because the ability level of the 25 to 35 children in the classroom is so wide.

"Some can read. Others can't pour their juice and some are still wetting their bed," he said.

Judy Pedersen can relate.

She said in one kindergarten class there could be a child with a 3-year-old's vocabulary and another reading at a second-grade level.

"Our job is to allow for growth," said Pedersen, president of Arlington Heights Elementary District 25's union. "A high school teacher is educating a more independent person."

Some, like state Rep. Mary Lou Cowlishaw, a Naperville Republican who serves on the Illinois House education committee, sides with high school teachers on the "who has the tougher job" debate. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Elementary Teachers Still Lagging on Pay Scale Salaries in High School Districts Set the Pace
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.