Journal Rates Singapore Tops in Globalization, U.S. as 12th

By Sands, David R. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 9, 2001 | Go to article overview

Journal Rates Singapore Tops in Globalization, U.S. as 12th


Sands, David R., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Singapore comes in first and the United States 12th in a new survey that attempts to measure a country's exposure to the forces of globalization.

The index, released yesterday by the journal Foreign Policy and the business consulting firm A.T. Kearney, is an effort to quantify a phenomenon that has prompted both hope and fear around the world as technology and economic change reshape international relations.

"There are many definitions of globalization out there," said Moises Naim, editor of Foreign Policy.

"What you don't get are the real scope and reach of what people are talking about. We decided to put some numbers to it," he said.

Researchers looked at 50 countries accounting for 95 percent of the world's economic output in 1998. Among the nine factors examined for each country: trade as a percentage of gross domestic economy, percentage of the population using the Internet, foreign direct investment, and the number of minutes of international phone calls per capita.

While the United States scored highest among the top 20 countries on the availability of globalizing technologies like the Internet, other countries ranked far higher in their interactions with the global economy and the exposure of their citizens to those outside the country.

After Singapore, a commercial and financial center for much of Southeast Asia, the next eight places in the index were held by Western European countries, led by the Netherlands, Sweden and Switzerland.

"Size matters," said Mr. Naim. "There is this notion that globalization works best for the big countries, but we found that the smaller you are, the easier it is to be globalized."

The average Swiss citizen logs four times the number of international telephone minutes as the average American. …

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