Lisle Abbey Opens Arms to Statue St. Procopius Sculpture Stands Tall despite Critics, Funding Woes

By Barrett, Kevin | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 25, 1998 | Go to article overview

Lisle Abbey Opens Arms to Statue St. Procopius Sculpture Stands Tall despite Critics, Funding Woes


Barrett, Kevin, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Kevin Barrett Daily Herald Staff Writer

For months now, the Rev. Michael Komechak has harbored news of the latest arrival at St. Procopius Abbey.

While Komechak and his fellow clerics have come and gone about their business, this giant of a fellow, hard as steel and unmovable as the rock of ages, silently looms over the courtyard of the Lisle abbey.

Comments like "disgusting" and "a monstrosity" have followed and may explain why Komechak has waited since November to introduce this difficult soul to the wider world.

"A lot of our people still haven't made a judgment yet," he said. But, he added, "It's like our building, it will grow on them."

It had better, since it is the centerpiece and namesake for the Benedictine community.

The new statue of St. Procopius holds the central spot in the courtyard between the abbey proper and the living quarters. It is, to say the least, unmistakable.

Several thousand pounds, 7 1/2 feet tall, and a quarter of a century in the planning, the figure welcomes visitors and residents alike with a juxtaposition of stolid countenance and wide-flung arms.

Created by sculptor Richard Hunt, the statue represents the latest edition to an already impressive collection of religious art and to a building that itself has garnered numerous architectural awards.

When the Benedictine brothers built their abbey in 1970, they planned for their centerpiece and even settled on the artist, said Komechak, an art professor at Benedictine University and the ad hoc curator for the abbey collection. But funds fell short.

A bequeath from the sister of a Procopius monk resulted in a 1995 commission for Hunt, the same artist singled out 25 years earlier.

Komechak admits that Hunt, a Chicago-born, African-American artist best know for large-scale abstract pieces, seems a strange choice to fashion a three-dimensional portrait of an 11th-century Czech Catholic monk.

The artist, whose works are owned by the Art Institute of Chicago, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and its neighbor the Whitney Museum, admitted as much himself in a statement to the abbey. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Lisle Abbey Opens Arms to Statue St. Procopius Sculpture Stands Tall despite Critics, Funding Woes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.