Group Rooted in Morals Needs to Compromise

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 27, 1998 | Go to article overview

Group Rooted in Morals Needs to Compromise


Byline: Jack Mabley

A full page ad advocating abstinence among unmarried young people was carried in Chicago papers eight years ago.

It was paid for by Focus on the Family, headed by James Dobson. I liked the idea, but had never heard of James Dobson.

I phoned the group's headquarters in Colorado. They were edgy about talking with a big city reporter and told me little. I still wrote an approving column about the ad.

James Dobson and his Focus on the Family have grown enormously in wealth and political influence.

Dobson is a major player today because he threatens to encourage his millions of followers to quit the Republican Party.

I am an accused liberal. I plead guilty on social issues. But I agree with James Dobson on matters beyond abstinence. He fights pornography, he decries the spread of gambling, he opposes the flood of sex and violence in TV and movies.

He interprets the Bible literally as the inspired, absolute truth.

He strongly opposes abortion. He believes life begins at conception. A case can be made in Genesis 2:7 that life begins with the first breath.

To accept that possibility would be compromise for Dobson.

If he hopes to influence politics, he should recognize that politics is the art of compromise. And accept that U.S. laws permit abortions.

And that Americans elected President Clinton twice knowing he was morally and ethically challenged.

Dobson doesn't like the media. He says, "The Constitution allows all of us free speech. That's not limited just to those who have no faith. That's sort of the notion the media has cooked up, but it has no basis in law and no basis in morality."

Doesn't Dobson know he is media, enjoying free speech? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Group Rooted in Morals Needs to Compromise
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.