Art Institute to Exhibit Van Gogh, Gauguin in 2001

By Allen, Jim | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 16, 1998 | Go to article overview

Art Institute to Exhibit Van Gogh, Gauguin in 2001


Allen, Jim, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Jim Allen Daily Herald Staff Writer

Officials at the Art Institute of Chicago said Friday their plans for the next millennium are a go: Paul Gauguin and Vincent van Gogh.

In 2001, the Art Institute will launch a major show of works by the two painters, a significant pairing because of how they were contemporaries and collaborators, but also bitter rivals.

Museum officials said the significance of the exhibit, "Van Gogh and Gauguin: The Studio of the South," is that the relationship between the two artists never has been studied in depth.

"The only reason we made this announcement so early is that there was a daylong symposium today in London, also being attended by officials from the Van Gogh Museum. It just seemed like a natural," said Art Institute spokeswoman Eileen Harakal.

After the show completes its run here in early 2002, the exhibit will be moved to the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam for a four-month run. Museum officials plan to try to borrow pieces from private collections and other institutions for the exhibition.

In the late 1880s, van Gogh and Gauguin both worked in France, admired each other's work and ultimately battled with each other. Van Gogh is thought to have cut off his left ear, one of history's best-known acts of self-mutilation, after an argument with Gauguin.

The two painters were credited with influencing the post-impressionism movement that blossomed in the years after they died. …

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