Builders Nail Down Tools Construction Sites Being Hit for Equipment and Materials

By Cole, Bill | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 15, 1998 | Go to article overview

Builders Nail Down Tools Construction Sites Being Hit for Equipment and Materials


Cole, Bill, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Bill Cole Daily Herald Staff Writer

Don Tonyan remembers that time he left the circular saw plugged in by the front door of Northern Illinois Medical Center.

The project manager for Wm. Tonyan & Sons was working a mere 100 yards away in the parking lot, putting in some boards that were being used to form new curbing at the McHenry job site.

"We weren't gone five minutes, and when we went back to get the saw, it was gone," he said. "Just somebody who wanted a saw, I guess."

The $150 circular was barely out of sight. Imagine the temptation when construction equipment is left unattended.

Contractors like Tonyan don't have to. They know what happens. It disappears.

Hundreds of dollars worth of scaffolding, $30,000 Bobcats, $1,000 concrete saws and generators, piles of lumber - even dirt - all vanish into the night if it's not nailed down, chained up, hoisted into the air or boxed in.

"It seems like there's more and more of it (theft) all the time. There's not a day that goes by that you are not taking precautions," said Tonyan, whose McHenry-based company has had two Bobcat-like Case Uni-Loaders stolen in the past 10 years.

Not only does a contractor lose an often valuable piece of equipment with a theft, paid workers then have nothing to do at a job site.

That means higher insurance premiums, the need to sometimes hire security guards, and ultimately, higher overall project costs.

Statistics are hard to come by, but Spence Miller, a partner in Chicago-based Schwartz Brothers Insurance Agency, which insures contractors, said deductibles of $500 to $1,000 five years ago "are now $1,000 to $2,500 at least, and then some."

"It used to be that the (equipment) gang box at the job site was stolen," Miller said. "Now, it's, 'My heavy piece of equipment is being taken.' "

The economics and motivation are simple. A $20,000 to $30,000 Uni-Loader is simple to steal and easy to sell, contractors say.

"Those things certainly went on before. But it's more prevalent now," said Ron Ahlman, executive director of the Fox Valley General Contractors Association, based in Geneva. "The cost of that equipment is a lot more than 10 years ago."

Cottage industries are springing up in the door-to-door sale of barely used construction equipment.

"I get people who stop by here who want to sell a (used) blade or pump, and I tell 'em, get out of here," Tonyan said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Builders Nail Down Tools Construction Sites Being Hit for Equipment and Materials
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.