Bartending Class Teaches Mixing Drinks, State Laws

By Mistretta, Elisabeth | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 8, 2001 | Go to article overview

Bartending Class Teaches Mixing Drinks, State Laws


Mistretta, Elisabeth, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Elisabeth Mistretta Daily Herald Staff Writer

The price of a drink at most bars often costs as much as an entire fast-food meal. Add the tip and it costs even more. But when patrons leave those extra bills on the bar, the tip should be for more than just service with a smile.

Some bartenders and state officials agree that bartenders must not only know their mixology and customer service, but they should also be savvy about alcohol laws and awareness to protect their customers and themselves.

According to Paul Froehlich, manager of special projects for the secretary of state, it's important for bartenders to have formal training on liquor laws and alcohol awareness.

"You're going to make more mistakes if you've got to learn everything the hard way," he said. "Bartenders need to get an idea about why the laws exist so that they won't just begrudgingly enforce them."

Froehlich teaches Operation Straight ID classes to bartending students at the Professional Bartending School in Villa Park. During his class, he teaches students how to spot fake IDs and laws for serving intoxicated patrons and minors. Students must attend his class in order to receive their state certification, called BASSET: Beverage Alcohol Sellers and Servers Education and Training.

Although this certification might help people get a job, it is not mandatory in Illinois. Froehlich said he thinks BASSET should be required for all servers and sellers of alcohol.

"It only makes sense that there's some sort of training required," he said. "The state requires training for so many other jobs, but it doesn't require anything for a job where you're dispensing a potentially addictive drug."

In addition to Froehlich's class, students at the bartending school must undergo other training in order to receive certification. Instructors teach them how to spot and handle intoxicated customers and how to prevent intoxication.

Kim Goodletson, an instructor at the Professional Bartending School, teaches students laws that are important for protecting themselves and their jobs. One such law is the mandatory serving of water or coffee with a drink that contains all liquor and no juices. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Bartending Class Teaches Mixing Drinks, State Laws
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.