Learning More beyond the Classroom Educators Back Legislation for Homework Policies

By Larson, Kristin | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 2, 1998 | Go to article overview

Learning More beyond the Classroom Educators Back Legislation for Homework Policies


Larson, Kristin, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Kristin Larson Daily Herald Staff Writer

Fifth-graders in Karen Todaro's class know that if they skip their homework assignment, they'll miss recess that day.

That rule is something Todaro made clear her first day of teaching at Seth Paine School in Lake Zurich.

"It's (homework) good for students," said Todaro, who's been teaching for one year. "It gives them responsibility, and in middle school and high school, that's going to be required of them."

Homework is a fact of life for students in grade school on up through high school and beyond.

What varies is how much.

House Speaker Michael Madigan will reintroduce a bill in the coming weeks that would force school districts that don't have a homework policy to initiate one.

Steve Brown, Madigan's press secretary, said the proposal would direct school districts to establish individual homework guidelines with the understanding that there'd be homework every day. Madigan is reintroducing the measure after an unsuccessful attempt to pass it last spring.

"Obviously, there would be changes from day to day and year to year, and obviously some schools would take different approaches to it," Brown said.

Also, economic and geographic factors might influence school district's individual policies, Brown said.

Recognizing the importance of homework, the Chicago Public School System adopted a systemwide homework policy for elementary and high school students in 1996. The policy suggests time allocations for assignments, starting with 15 minutes at the kindergarten level, to 45 minutes for grades four, five and six, to 150 minutes for 12th-graders.

While it's impossible to come up with a hard and fast rule for the amount of homework assigned, Chicago schools officials and several Lake County educators say it generally is 10 minutes multiplied by the grade level. Fifth-graders, for example, should expect 50 minutes of homework per night.

Some teachers say they may sometimes assign less work, or skip a night altogether, to allow slower students to catch up.

Regardless of how it's handled, Judy Giannamore, curriculum coordinator at the Mundelein elementary district, said there's no doubt homework is good for students and a necessary part of school.

"It gives kids a chance to practice and perfect skills," Giannamore said. "Of course, there's less homework at the primary level, and it could be something as basic as counting round objects in your house or coloring."

By definition, homework at the primary grades is often what students haven't finished in class. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Learning More beyond the Classroom Educators Back Legislation for Homework Policies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.