Top Attorneys to Trade Views in Capital Punishment Debate

By Janota, Laura; Allen, Jim | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 8, 1998 | Go to article overview

Top Attorneys to Trade Views in Capital Punishment Debate


Janota, Laura, Allen, Jim, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Laura Janota & Jim Allen

It's a life-or-death talk.

As debate rages over Karla Faye Tucker's execution in Texas, two of Cook County's legal giants will butt heads Tuesday over capital punishment.

The Chicago Bar Association debate features William Kunkle Jr., lead prosecutor of serial killer John Wayne Gacy, vs. Randolph Stone, a University of Chicago law professor who was Cook County's first black public defender.

The debate will begin at noon at CBA headquarters, 321 Plymouth Court, and will be moderated by John Callaway, host of WTTW-TV's "Chicago Tonight."

* * *

Acting up, way up: Two Loyola University Chicago theater majors, both with suburban roots, will go to the upcoming American College Theatre Festival competition in April in Washington D.C.

The two are Ian Brennan, who won the festival's regional acting competition, and Brittany Stephan, Brennan's partner, who won the best partner award.

Both are former Prospect High School graduates who live in Mount Prospect.

* * *

Climbing a-board: Most are Democrats, but Cook County Board commissioners resolved to "strenuously support" bringing a Republican National Convention to Chicago in 2000.

That move came as a delegation representing Mayor Richard M. Daley and Gov. Jim Edgar were making a preliminary pitch to party leaders in Washington, D.C. Their focus was the party's strong historic tie to Chicago.

Chicago, they noted, has hosted more Republican conventions than any other city, with eight eventual presidents nominated here.

Those included Abe Lincoln's nomination in 1860, which formed the foundation of the party, and later Teddy Roosevelt's rise to power. Dwight Eisenhower's transformation from war hero to politician also took place here, as did Richard Nixon's 1960 nomination.

Cleverly and diplomatically, the city's literature added, "though it was said he (Nixon) also lost the election here and would take another eight years to win it back."

They're also making note that most of the contributors to the 1996 Democratic National Convention were companies with ties to the Republican party. The logic goes like this: If they're willing to do it in the name of civic pride for the Democrats, they're sure to come through for the Republicans.

* * *

Conventional costs: On another front, Daley pointed out how the city introduced something new for the 1996 Democratic convention: a tight budget.

Joking with reporters last week, Hizzoner said some Beltway-types saw the surplus and said "spend, spend, spend. …

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