Cultures Adapt Epiphany Celebrations to Beliefs, Traditions

By Edman, Catherine | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 5, 1998 | Go to article overview

Cultures Adapt Epiphany Celebrations to Beliefs, Traditions


Edman, Catherine, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Catherine Edman Daily Herald Staff Writer

There's excitement among the people as a doughnut-shaped bread is sliced and passed around.

They all wait for the hidden prize to surface.

It's Epiphany, and this game is all part of the feast, the celebration they hold to honor Jesus Christ's birth and the revelation to the Magi, or three kings, that the child was from God.

Elsewhere, priests prepare for a sequence of reverent services praising God.

Water is blessed, then sprinkled throughout the church on the altar, the icons, parishioners.

They, too, are celebrating Epiphany, but their celebration centers around the baptism of Jesus Christ by the Holy Spirit in the river Jordan and the revelation to John the Baptist, and the world, that Christ was indeed God, explained Niko Yelic, assistant to the priest at St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church in Elmhurst.

Christians throughout the area began celebrating Epiphany on Sunday. For some, the celebration ended when they left church. For others, it begins tonight or Tuesday, and continues for the next week.

The differences between Christian Epiphany celebrations go beyond mere traditions, as with Christmas. Many churches are actually celebrating different events.

Theophany, as Epiphany is called in the Orthodox Church, is the feast celebrating the "appearing of God to the world that he has come to the world in the flesh to redeem it," Yelic explained. People in the Orthodox religions celebrate that revelation in the biblical story of Christ's baptism in the Jordan River.

But in the Roman Catholic Church, and in most Protestant religions, the celebration revolves around the story of Christ's birth in Bethlehem, and how three wise men sought to find the child they were told was from God.

There's no clear answer as to why the difference exists, although scholars have offered a wealth of suggestions without settling on one explanation, said Robert E. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cultures Adapt Epiphany Celebrations to Beliefs, Traditions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.