7 Tidbits of Holiday Tree Trivia

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), December 5, 1997 | Go to article overview

7 Tidbits of Holiday Tree Trivia


Byline: Stephanie McClelland

As Christmas draws near, people will search high and low for that perfect tree. Once they find it, they decorate it with cherished ornaments, glittering lights and other trinkets chosen with care. Over the years, the Christmas tree has become one of the favorite yuletide traditions families can share.

Link to the past

Historians credit German religious reformer Martin Luther with starting the tradition of Christmas trees.

Luther was walking in the woods one evening when he was overcome by the beauty of the snow and moonlight twinkling off the evergreen branches. He apparently cut a tree down, took it home and decorated it, according to the book "All About Christmas," by Maymie Krythe.

By the 1600s, Germans were annually cutting firs and decorating the trees with apples, flowers and gold foil. The traditions later spread to Norway, Denmark, England and the United States.

Old-time favorites:

Of all the different types of evergreens, Christmas revelers have found 7 they return to time and time again. The most popular trees are Douglas firs, Fraser firs, Balsam firs, white spruce, blue spruce, white pine and Scotch pine. …

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7 Tidbits of Holiday Tree Trivia
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