Police Integrity Report Proves to Be Light Read

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 11, 1997 | Go to article overview

Police Integrity Report Proves to Be Light Read


Byline: Bill Granger

The mayor finally issued the Webb commission report on police integrity last week.

In the same week, more than 100 Chicago police officers - in uniform and out - crowded the courtroom where the latest whistle-blower against police brutality was appearing with baton marks on his head. The cop/spectators were not there to intimidate the man whom fellow officers allegedly beat up. Not at all.

The mayor did not even give one of his famous giggles when he issued the pathetic report.

The report took nine months to be born. It was puny at birth.

"Report of the Commission on Police Brutality" has 38 pages.

Page 1 is a table of contents. Pages 2 and 3 summarize the report and its recommendations. Here they are:

New cops should have a college degree and a one-year work history before they are hired. The report was prepared - for a fee, paid by the city - by the University of Illinois at Chicago's "Office of International Criminal Justice." UIC offers a college degree program for would-be cops.

New cops should be on probation 18 months instead of 12.

Cops should have to keep going to school after they become cops.

An "early warning" system should be set up to alert top cops when cops have problems. The department should improve its management.

That's it.

Page 4 describes the members of the commission set up in February. It was headed by Dan Webb, private lawyer and former federal prosecutor. Page 5 is a commercial for the UIC's office of criminal justice and its qualified people. Page 6 says the commission went to other cities to interview cops and interviewed cops in Chicago and read a lot of things about police corruption. Things read were listed on pages 31, 32, 33, 34 and 35.

Page 7 is a history of police corruption in the United States. So is Page 8.

Pages 9, 10, 11 and 12 are histories of police corruption in Chicago, focusing on the Austin and Gresham police district drug and corruption scandals of the past two years.

Page 13 is a three-paragraph summary of the way the police department is organized and a three-paragraph commercial for the community policing program (called CAPS for Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy). It ends: "In the long run this (CAPS) will foster better relations between the police officers and the community they serve and should lead to fewer incidents of corruption."

Pages 14, 15 and 16 describe the present police discipline process. …

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