Vacation Bible School Bucks Tradition

By Spencer, Mark | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 17, 1997 | Go to article overview

Vacation Bible School Bucks Tradition


Spencer, Mark, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Mark Spencer Daily Herald Staff Writer

It wasn't quite Great America, but the kids seemed to love it just the same.

Vacation Bible school became the "Wild Frontier Bible Theme Park" at Risen Savior Lutheran Church in Indian Creek last week.

More than 100 children enjoyed some western-style fun with their summertime Bible lessons at the church on Route 45 west of Butterfield Road.

"Ride crews" of kids traveled around the church-turned-theme park to various attractions, including "Carousel Crafts," the "Sing and Play Jamboree Stage" and a spot where they posed for pictures while sitting atop a saddled sawhorse.

All the while, the grade-school age kids were learning some basic lesson about Christianity while shouting "yee haw!" plenty of times.

"We had parents telling us their kids couldn't wait to come back," said Don "Deputy Dawg" Busse of Mundelein, minister of Christian education at the church.

While many other churches charge for their vacation Bible school programs, Risen Savior Lutheran Church's remains free.

The Bible school is paid for through proceeds from a two-night spaghetti dinner the church holds each year at Vernon Hills Summer Celebration. …

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