LHS Girls Turn-About Dance Traditions

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 10, 1997 | Go to article overview

LHS Girls Turn-About Dance Traditions


Byline: Jessica Abel

School dances are fun. At least, in my limited experience, that has been the case. And I believe frequent dance-goers would agree with me. As the Feb. 22 Turn-About Dance approaches, Libertyville Community High School is abuzz with excitement. Whether students decide to attend dances, they are certainly a reason for socialization.

Turn-About differs from the Homecoming dance in two ways: A football game does not precede the dance; and, the female party must ask the male party to accompany her (and she gets to pay the bill). Despite those differences, the basic premise of such occasions is the same.

For weeks, or sometimes months, before the dance, finding a date is the task at hand for both sexes. Once a date is hunted down, a group must be formed, a place for dinner must be agreed upon and, of course, a dress must be purchased.

The course of events leading up to the actual time of the dance is always amusing to observe. The frenzy that goes with finding a date is probably the most humorous. Girls will think for months ahead of time of creative ways to ask the male of choice. These creative inquisitions become a quest for many.

"It seems that the girls get more creative in ways of asking guys to dances," said junior Emily Greenfield.

Examples of the creativity of the female population include such deeds as stuffing the male's car with balloons and an invitation to the dance. A girl has also been known to send her potential date a pass out of his class, while she waits for him in the office with roses and her invitation.

"My date asked me to Turn-About by calling me down to the office and having it look like I was in trouble," said junior Tim Finegan. …

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