Schools Moving Spelling Up on Their Priority List

By Wong, Dwayne T. | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 19, 1997 | Go to article overview

Schools Moving Spelling Up on Their Priority List


Wong, Dwayne T., Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Dwayne T. Wong Daily Herald Staff Writer

Children should know what words to use in a sentence and how to spell them.

That's what Prospect Heights Elementary District 23 officials recently told administrators about developing programs to halt a slide in students' spelling skills.

District 23 board member Mari Cohen said the panel wants it "so kids realize even with (computer) spell check, all the words on the paper have to be spelled right."

The District 23 board became concerned about the subject after results from the Iowa Test of Basic Skills showed an increasing number of its fourth-grade students falling into the below average category in spelling over the past few years.

Last week, parents presented a petition with 160 signatures to District 23 officials asking them to make improving the school system's spelling curriculum "a priority."

Some Northwest suburban educators, including those in District 23, have partially blamed the decline in spelling scores to an increase in testing of students who are not proficient in English.

They also cite an increasing number of at-risk students now attending area schools, rising enrollments and a high number of children moving out of and into schools during the year as factors contributing to the problem.

However, District 23 is not alone in its struggles with lagging student test scores in spelling.

In neighboring River Trails Elementary District 26, for example, officials are challenged by a similar downward trend in students' reading scores.

District 26 Superintendent Shirley F. Smalley says factors cited by District 23 officials contribute to problems students experience learning English.

"It (language) is reading, writing, speaking and listening. It's in the writing part where you deal with spelling and grammar," she said.

District 26 officials recently approved a host of short-term programs to help students struggling in reading and other subjects.

Those programs include developing the Northwest suburb's first pre-kindergarten summer school for children entering the district lacking "readiness" skills needed for learning. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Schools Moving Spelling Up on Their Priority List
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    New feature

    It is estimated that 1 in 10 people have dyslexia, and in an effort to make Questia easier to use for those people, we have added a new choice of font to the Reader. That font is called OpenDyslexic, and has been designed to help with some of the symptoms of dyslexia. For more information on this font, please visit OpenDyslexic.org.

    To use OpenDyslexic, choose it from the Typeface list in Font settings.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.