Nurses Learn to Use the Mind to Heal the Body

By Skweres, Ginny | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 3, 1997 | Go to article overview

Nurses Learn to Use the Mind to Heal the Body


Skweres, Ginny, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Ginny Skweres Daily Herald Correspondent

The cure for heart disease, cancer, depression, diabetes, arthritis and autoimmune disease could be within a patient's reach according to Stuart Tousman, associate psychology professor at Rockford College.

"The body has its own natural healing power," Tousman said.

In a seminar presented recently at the College of DuPage in Glen Ellyn, Tousman explained how the mind and body can work together for self-healing.

The course drew both DuPage residents and nurses seeking continuing education hours.

Cindy Clark of West Chicago said she had two reasons to take the course. As a nurse, she works in a retirement home and would like to empower the residents use these techniques. She also wants to put them into practice for herself because she has an autoimmune disorder.

Chris Engler of Chicago supervises a group home for mentally disturbed young adults.

"There's an awful lot of pain in the house and many of the kids are on medications. I'd like to set up some programs and activities that could help them," Engler said.

Also seeking a practical application was Craig Hilgendorf, a Wheaton chiropractor. He agrees with Tousman's theory and said nerve action affects people's health. "The more nerve action, the healthier they are," he said.

Tousman told seminar participants that children come into this world with no eating disorders, stress-related sleep disorders or assertiveness and communication disorders. These are things bodies learn to do, he said.

"People get into an emotional state that affects their body, and they should be able to bring themselves back," Tousman said. "The brain has all of the structures and chemicals necessary to allow optimal living."

There are psychological techniques that can affect cures, he said. In addition, these methods cost nothing and have no side effects.

Some of the techniques in this new field of psychoneuroimmunolgy involve visual imagery, meditation, muscle relaxation, diet, breathing and exercise.

Through research, doctors have learned about chemicals in the brain such as endorphins, serotonin and melatonin, as well as neurotransmitters and the locations in the brain that produce or are affected by the chemicals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nurses Learn to Use the Mind to Heal the Body
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.