Festival Moves to Beat of Native Culture Woman Shows History Relates to Chicago

By Womer, Kelly | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 24, 1996 | Go to article overview

Festival Moves to Beat of Native Culture Woman Shows History Relates to Chicago


Womer, Kelly, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Kelly Womer Daily Herald Correspondent

Carolyn Lauing-Finzer says the world would be a better place if people took a few lessons from American Indians.

So she has become the teacher, wearing traditional regalia for pow-wows, beating a hand drum, recounting legends and researching different tribes to share pages from their history with others.

"We need to carry a part of Native American culture in our heart," said Lauing-Finzer, who lives in Naperville. "Native Americans need to be listened to today. They had a great bond with nature and reverence for all living things."

Lauing-Finzer will give residents of all ages a glimpse into the past and into American Indian culture during the Indian and Pioneer Festival from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday at the Greene Farm, a half-mile west of Route 53 on Hobson Road in Woodridge. The event also features historic re-enactments, arts, crafts, demonstrations, children's activities and continuous folk music.

At 3 p.m., Lauing-Finzer will present her program, explaining the food, clothing, housing, stories and traditions of the Pottawatomie Indians.

"I'm glad to help DuPage County residents understand Native American culture," she said.

Lauing-Finzer also will tell local history as it relates to the Indian tribes. Chicago, for example was named after an Indian term for wild onion. Ogden Avenue used to be a buffalo path that cut through DuPage County.

"I hope to convey the colorful ways, rich traditions and rich spirit of Native Americans," said Lauing-Finzer, a former teacher and Girl Scout leader for 21 years. "When you look at their traditions, they always link to the web and circle of life. We're just a part of it."

To further explore the pioneer and Indian history, pow-wow dancing by Pottawatomie, Chippewa and Ottawa Indians from the American Indian Center in Chicago will be performed at 2 p. …

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